Tuesday, February 28, 2012

The Letter, Oil Painting Inspired by Matisse, by k Madison Moore



The Letter
Inspired by Henri Matisse

©kMadisonMooreMkM2012


11 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas

Painting with The Masters
Art within Art Series


SOLD

I so wish the colors showed better on the net!
I hear so many times how much better my paintings are in hand.
Then every monitor is different as well. Not to mention that I wish
I had more talent in the area of photography.
The colors a hues of pinks, coral, shrimp, peach, lavenders
are really so pretty together in this painting. You know how much
I love Matisse for his mixing of colors and patterns.
The nude is in basic form of one of Henri's nudes but with a 
totally different face. The window, curtains and scene is 
is my take on elements from his paintings as well as
the table, chair and still life. This is a great combination
of my impression of Matisse.

Is she sleeping or is she in deep thought?
humm......wonder what's in that letter?
What do you think?
Enjoy!


Henri Matisse
Birth Year :1869
Death Year :1954
Country :France

Henri Matisse was born in Le Chateau, in the north of France. His plans to enter the law profession were interrupted by an attack of appendicitis. During a long convalescence, Matisse 's attempts at painting encouraged him to study art. He was twenty-two when he arrived in Paris to study with Bourgereau at the Beaux-Arts and to work also with Gustave Moreau. Matisse 's early paintings were dark, naturalistic works, but by 1896 he had taken up Neo-Impressionist techniques, working in light color and short strokes. By 1905, he was the leader of the Fauve movement, and by 1908 he had embarked on the course that was to influence all contemporary painting since that date: an exploration of the possibilities of painting as a decorative and sensuous art.



Saturday, February 25, 2012

Illusions of Picasso, Inspired by Pablo Picasso by k Madison Moore

Illusions of Picasso
Inspired by Pablo Picasso

©kMadisonMooreMkM2012


11 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas


Sold

Goodness, my eyes are crossed from this one!
I love illusions but they are really tough to paint.
Keeping the lines separated is a chore.
However I am always challenging myself so I really
did have a lot of fun painting this one.
Can you image staring at that wall all day!!

This is a short post as I am burnt from
working long days completing all my commissions.
Have a great sunday everyone.

Enjoy!

Don't forget to mention the paintings title. Contact Me for paintings similar to sold paintings Please feel free to email me with questions or for no obligation quotes. Commission Projects Welcome
foxyform.com

Peter Max Inspired Painting, I Love You Peter by k Madison Moore

Peter's  Piano II
A Homage to Peter Max

©kMadisonMooreMkM2011

12 x 16 Oil Painting on Canvas
Click the Photo for My Lightbox


I did a Homage to Pater Max in the beginning of the year titled
Peter's Piano. I have to say that it is one of the most popular paintings for
this year. I did several similar, but not the same commissions, including a
very large format commission for a friend of Peter Max's, which just
thrilled me. I Check out his site www.themaxcollector.com

I thought it would be great to do another now as Peter just released
 his new isong
Check it our at the links below
You have to love him. He has works all over the place and knows
 so many people and other artists. What a legacy!...and such a nice guy too! I
have listed some facts about him here that I thought were interesting.
 Always learning something new! Love it!

This painting is 12 x 16, a really nice size and different from the first
 Peter's Piano at 11 x 14.
It is my impression of combined elements from five of Peter's
 paintings including his self portrait. The flooring is from another as well as
the Baldwin Piano that he painted. What great colors!
Custom Floater Frames are available upon request.

This would make a great gift for a Peter Max Lover.
Thanks Peter. Love ya!
Enjoy!



In honor of NPR's 40th anniversary, the iconic pop artist 
Peter Max
 has graciously designed this limited edition 
Tivoli iSongBook for NPR.





Peter Max (born Peter Max Finkelstein, October 19, 1937) is a
 German-born Jewish American artist best known for his “Cosmic 60s”
 art style, as it came to be known in the 1960's . At first, works in this
style appeared on posters and were seen on the walls of college dorms
all across America. Max then became fascinated with new printing techniques
 that allowed for four-color reproduction on product merchandise.
In 1970, many of Max's products and posters were featured in the exhibition
 "The World of Peter Max" which opened at the M.H. de Young
Memorial Museum in San Francisco. The US Postal Service commissioned
Max to create the first 10¢ postage stamp to commemorate the  Expo
74World's Fair in Spokane, Washington. July 4, 1976, Max began his
 Statue of Liberty series leading to his efforts with  Chrysler CEO Lee
Iacocca  to help spearhead the restoration of the statue.

Official artist for many major events including Grammy Awards, Rock
 and Roll Hall of Fame, The Super bowl and others.

He also hosted the Xpress Peter Max Coloring Contest in the St. Petersburg
 Times in November 2005. The contest, located in St. Petersburg, Florida,
was a contest for children to color in a sketch by Max. Of 800 entries, 90
were sent to Max, who chose a grand prize winner, a runner-up and 10
honorable mentions

Max's art work was a part of the Psychedelic movement in graphic design.
His work was much imitated in commercial illustration in the late 1960s
and early 1970s.

His artwork is currently on the walls of CBS's The Early Show where
his newly created installation of 44 Obamas, commemorating the 44th
President of The United States was debuted.

Max owns a collection of 36 Chevrolet Corvettes, dating from 1953 to
1988, one for each year. The collection has been horribly neglected.
Peter Max is an environmentalist and defender of human and animal rights.

One of Continental Airlines" Boeing 777-200ER aircraft
(registered N77014) sported a special livery designed by Max.
The livery was removed in the winter of 2007–2008.

Peter Max currently lives in New York Citywith his wife, Mary Max.
Pater Max Quotes

Quote:I never know what I'm going to put on the canvas. The canvas paints itself.
 I'm just the middleman.
Peter Max

Quote: There's nothing like New Orleans. When it comes back, it will be a tremendous
 highlight for America.
Peter Max












Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Inspired by Matisse, Her Ship in The Night by k Madison Moore


Her Ship in The Night
Inspired by Matisse

©kMadisonMoore2012

11 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas

SOLD
Art within Art Series

The fun part of working with Matisse
is mixing patterns. He used so many
patterns and brilliant colors in one painting.
It can  get confusing at times.
I have used this Matisse model a few times.
I think it is one of my favorites because of
it's simplicity.
The table is set and the wine is poured
so I wonder who is on that ship?


Matisse and His Models

The French expression for thunderbolt—coup de foudre—means “love at first sight,” with all the undertones of violence and risk that were an intrinsic part of Matisse’s passion for painting. Anxiety and dread hung over his studio sessions. Toward the end of his life he told an interviewer that each canvas began as a flirtation and ended up as a rape. He said it was himself, not his subject—or rather it was the feelings his subject aroused in him—that had to be raped. The subject itself could be fruit, flowers or a fabric screen, as often as a human sitter. The young women who posed for him all learned to live and work in the atmosphere of almost unbearable tension generated by Matisse’s effort to express his emotions on canvas—an effort that drained all his strength.
Matisse himself knew perfectly well that the erotic charge in his work came from a passionate desire that overrode straightforward lust. It was painting itself that seduced him over and over again with each fresh canvas. In old age when he was too weak to stand all day at the easel, he feared going blind as well “because of having flirted for too long . . . with these enchanted colors.”
All his life Matisse drove his models as well as himself to the limits of endurance. He insisted it was better to risk ruining a painting than be satisfied with a surface likeness. It’s always necessary to force your whole being beyond this stage, he told his daughter, Marguerite, because it’s only then that you start to make discoveries, and tear yourself apart in the process.

Matisse Inspired Painting, Waiting for Her Ship to Come In

Waiting for Her Ship to Come In
Inspired by Matisse

©kMadisonMooreMkM

11 x 14 Oil painting on Canvas

Art within Art Series

SOLD

I always love my inspirations from Matisse as I get to use and mix patterns and many colors and somehow they always come out great!  She is just napping there by the window in the summer breeze
with a nice glass of red.....while "Waiting for Her Ship to Come In". Hummmm...wonder who's on the ship?
Enjoy

Friday, February 17, 2012

Monet's Tranquility, Inspired by Monet by k Madison Moore


Monet's Tranquility

14 x 14 inches Oil on Canvas

Art within Art Series

SOLD
I went for a whole new perspective with this Art within Art Painting. Instead of a close up, or a section of a room I wanted to do the entire room. Making the windows really high makes the room look so grand which then of course I had to add the baby grand piano. A piano painted just for Monet.
I especially like the way the crystal chandelier brightens the room and adds a jeweled affect to the composition.

Imagine a pianist sitting in this grand room overlooking playing beautiful music overlooking Monet's
Japanese foot bridge over the water lily pond in his garden of Giverny.
Monet painted several paintings of this bridge on his property.
Enjoy!








Claude Monet  born Oscar Claude Monet (14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926), was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement's philosophy of expressing one's perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plien-air landscape painting.


When Monet traveled to Paris to visit the Louvre, he witnessed painters copying from the old masters. Having brought his paints and other tools with him, he would instead go and sit by a window and paint what he saw Monet was in Paris for several years and met other young painters who would become friends and fellow impressionists; among them was Edouard Manet.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

The Answer, Inspired by de Lempicka by k Madison Moore


The Answer
Inspired by de Lempicka

©kMadisonMooreMkM2012

11 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas

Painting with The Masters
Art within Art Series




I thought I would have some fun and do another Big Hat
Painting. I love these and they have been popular.
This one is really more all of my own and the only elements.
Tamara's gentleman  was perfect for the story.

I love the way he is looking at her while she is
intently thinking weather to accept that ring or not.
Do you think she will?
 Enjoy!


Tamara de Lempicka (May 16, 1898 - March 18, 1980), born Maria Gorska in Warsaw, Poland, was a Polish Art Deco painter.
Born into a wealthy and prominent family, her father was a Polish lawyer, her mother, the former Malvina Decler, a Polish socialite. Maria was the middle child with two siblings. She attended boarding school in Lausanne, Switzerland, and spent the winter of 1911 with her grandmother in Italy and the French Riviera, where she was treated to her first taste of the Great Masters of Italian painting. In 1912, her parents divorced and Maria went to live with her wealthy Aunt Stefa in St. Petersberg, Russia. 










The Answer, Inspired by de Lempicka by k Madison Moore


The Answer
Inspired by de Lempicka

©kMadisonMooreMkM2012

11 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas

Painting with The Masters
Art within Art Series


Sold
Contact Me for Similar Paintings


I thought I would have some fun and do another Big Hat
Painting. I love these and they have been popular.
This one is really more all of my own and the only element
I used here was the man in the mirror that is my take
on her gentleman. He was perfect for the story.

I love the way he is looking at her while she is
intently thinking weather to accept that ring or not.
Do you think se will?

Enjoy!


Tamara de Lempicka (May 16, 1898 - March 18, 1980), born Maria Gorska in Warsaw, Poland, was a Polish Art Deco painter.
Born into a wealthy and prominent family, her father was a Polish lawyer, her mother, the former Malvina Decler, a Polish socialite. Maria was the middle child with two siblings. She attended boarding school in Lausanne, Switzerland, and spent the winter of 1911 with her grandmother in Italy and the French Riviera, where she was treated to her first taste of the Great Masters of Italian painting. In 1912, her parents divorced and Maria went to live with her wealthy Aunt Stefa in St. Petersberg, Russia. 










Monday, February 13, 2012

Reflections of Rivera, by k Madison Moore, Inspired by Diego Rivera


Reflections of Rivera
Inspired by Diego Rivera

©kMadisonMooreMkM

14 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas


Painting with The Masters
Art within Art Series



I found a new painting by Diego Rivera that
included a similar beautiful woman to the one I have
painted here. I changed the face totally. I loved her gown
and her holding the mirror so that is close to his.
Diego is well know for painting Calla Lillie's so I 
thought that would be a nice touch.

I actually dreamed about the background for this
I like the dark dreaminess of the room and the birds
and vines lingering above. I think the chair took longer
to paint than anything else with the candy cane cording
and the fringe and tassels. So much fun!
Enjoy Reflections of Rivera.



Diego Rivera and his love Frieda Kahlo

Diego Rivera was born in Guanajuato, Mexico in 1886. He began to study painting at an early age and in 1907 moved to Europe. Spending most of the next fourteen years in Paris, Rivera encountered the works of such great masters as C├ęzanne, Gauguin, Renoir, and Matisse.

Considered the greatest Mexican painter of the twentieth century, Diego Rivera had a profound effect on the international art world. Among his many contributions, Rivera is credited with the reintroduction of fresco painting into modern art and architecture. His radical political views and tempestuous romance with the painter Frieda Kahlo were then, and remain today, a source of public intrigue. In a series of visits to America, from 1930 to 1940, Rivera brought his unique vision to public spaces and galleries, enlightening and inspiring artists and laymen alike.

Rivera remained a central force in the development of a national art in Mexico throughout his life. In 1957, at the age of seventy, Rivera died in Mexico City. Perhaps one his greatest legacies, however, was his impact on America’s conception of public art.

“An artist is above all a human being, profoundly human to the core. If the artist can’t feel everything that humanity feels, if the artist isn’t capable of loving until he forgets himself and sacrifices himself if necessary, if he won’t put down his magic brush and head the fight against the oppressor, then he isn’t a great artist.” - Diego Rivera



Thursday, February 9, 2012

Inspired by Matisse, Henri's Harem by k Madison Moore

Henri's Harem

Painting Inspired by Henri Matisse

©kMadisonMooreMkM2011

12 x 16   Oil painting on canvas

SOLD
Art with Art Series

I was reading about Matisse's Models and came up with this
idea. In this painting I did my take on many of his models.
I made many color and patten changes and changed the facial
features. The flowers, vases, checkerboard, table, furniture 
and wall patterns are inspired by different Matisse paintings.

I have such an attraction for Matisse. He was so passionate about
his work. He used such bold colors and mixed patterns with
 patterns and painted table tops facing the viewer as it was more
 important for the elements on the table to be painted.
He had a passion for painting woman in sheer tops and harem
pants. Maybe he wished for a harem...or maybe he had one!
He was hard to model for and went through many,
many models. See a great article I have included below
from the Smithsonian about Matisse and his models.
I thought it would be great to give Henri his Harem lying 
around sipping wine while Henri peeps in.
Enjoy " Henri's Harem"

Please visit My Portfolio to see
more in this series




 Matisse and His Models

The French expression for thunderbolt—coup de foudre—means “love at first sight,” with all the undertones of violence and risk that were an intrinsic part of Matisse’s passion for painting. Anxiety and  dread hung over his studio sessions. Toward the end of his life he told an interviewer that each canvas began as a flirtation and ended up as a rape. He said it was himself, not his subject—or rather it was the feelings his subject aroused in him—that had to be raped. The subject itself could be fruit, flowers or a fabric screen, as often as a human sitter. The young women who posed for him all learned to live and work in the atmosphere of almost unbearable tension generated by Matisse’s effort to express his emotions on canvas—an effort that drained all his strength.

Matisse’s reputation as a Modernist leader was built on this sort of shock. So his followers saw it as an unforgivable betrayal when he moved from Paris to Nice ten years later and started painting good-looking young women in transparent tops and harem pants lounging on cushioned divans.





Friday, February 3, 2012

Inspired by Gustave Klimt, A Kiss for The Tree of Life by k Madison Moore

A Kiss for The Tree of Life
Inspired by Gustav Klimt

©kMadisonMooreMkM2012

11 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas

Painting with The Masters
Art within Art  Series

SOLD

I love to paint with Klimt but when I do the paintings
are endless and take so much time. He used so many
symbols and swirls and blocks of color. It takes many
sittings with drying in between and layers of glazes
to complete on of these paintings.

The Tree of Life was a very significant  painting of
his as well as The Kiss that I though it would be great
to combine my impression of his tow works into one
painting.
I guess they will cuddle under that fluffy cover after
that kiss!



 Gustav Klimt was an Austrian painter known for painted erotic and romantic images in most of his paintings. However, he also did other paintings of landscapes and nature. Gustav Klimt’s tree of life depicts this same tree, with significant features on it. It connects the three worlds surrounding man; those are The Underworld, The Earth, and The Heavens. Its roots are deep into the earth, probably signifying that for life to be sustained, Mother Nature must be involved. The roots then come up to the aboveground and meet into forming the tree’s trunk that is on the earth. The tree’s branches extent to the heavens. In the history of man, The Tree of Life has had a significant meaning. It has been linked with several religious practices and traditions, depicting the source and sustenance of man’s life.
The klimt tree of life has been around forever it’s a spiritual tradition symbolizing life with its roots embedded in the earth and its top going to heaven. The tree is a symbol to many faiths of wisdom, rebirth, love, strength, friendship, redemption, and encouragement. Many artists will represent the tree of life differently. Some will just show the tree alone, some may show the tree with objects in it, yet others may show a tree with a background. All these objects in and around the tree represent many different things to many different people and artists. So for some it is not only a tree of life but how to live life.
Klimt Gustav painted Tree of Life, during his Golden Era as seen by the extensive use of the golden color on this piece. It has had thousands of different interpretations, but all of them still tend to agree that this tree has all to do with man’s living.
There is also the belief that the Tree of Life represents distinct virtues as well as qualities that an individual can possess. This includes wisdom, strength and even beauty. The religious aspect of the tree is that it represents the Creator and the tree can be applied to symbolize the creation of humans. It also represents a growth of a human. A person can have roots to their home after which will branch out to do other things with their life and new people. The trunk, in this analogy, represents the mind as well as the body with the individual, which connects almost everything together.

Read More

Klimt



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