Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Painting Inspired by Joan Miro, Miro's Game by k Madison Moore

Miro's Game

©kMadisonMooreMkM2011 

(click image for detailed view)

11 x 14 Oil Painting on Canvas

SOLD

Art within Art Series
Love, love, love Joan Miro. I guess because using primary colors in one of my favorite things. I also love his playful attitude with his work. He was known for being childish with his paintings. I look at his work as just really fun! That said, I decided to do a fun room that I would think Miro would get a kick out of. Here it looks as if the party is over. Must have been a great gambling game going on here. Look at all those cards stacked up, poker chips, money on the floor, wine bottle and wine spilled and some forgot their baseball cap on the sofa. Who do those sneakers belong to? Is someone walking barefoot? The back ground and floor are from two of Miro's paintings as well.
Just a lot of fun to paint with all these brilliant colors. Enjoy!

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Joan Miró i Ferrà (Catalan pronunciation(April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983) was a  Spanish      Catalan,  Sculptor, and ceramicist born in Barcelona.

In the beginnings of his career he dabbled in different painting styles that were fashionable at the turn of the century like Fauvism and Cubism.

Joan Miro is known for his playful art. His emblematic images make a naive, childlike impression at first sight. In contrast to the image of his art, he was a solid, hard-working man who preferred to come to gallery exhibitions in dark business suits.

In numerous interviews dating from the 1930s onwards, Miró expressed contempt for conventional painting methods as a way of supporting bourgeois society, and famously declared an "assassination of painting" in favour of upsetting the visual elements of established painting.

In 1920 Miro made the first of a series of trips to Paris. In 1921 he settled permanently in the French capital. He met  Pablo Picasso  and many of the other great painters and artists living in Paris - the center of arts in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century.

In 1956 Miro could finally move into the villa of his dreams. Located in Palma de Majorca and built by the architect Josep Lluis Sert. The new home was built in an ultra-modern style typical for the avant-garde architecture of the fifties. In 1992 it was transformed into the Miro Museum open for the public.

More about Miro

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